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Category Archives: Nurses

The hardest work ever

English: A subarachnoid hemorrhage.

Just a brief over view what happened during the years of recovery.  I struggled daily with only energy for 3 to 4 hours every day.  All my life before this injury I use to sleep not more than 3 or 4 hours a night.  I did not have time to sleep.  I was simply too busy.  I worked, and I worked hard! Read the rest of this entry »

 

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Simple tips understanding brain injury: food for thought

Recovery from brain injury prognosis is better when younger.  Prognosis is always best with proper rehabilitation.  Is ongoing rehabilitation Read the rest of this entry »

 

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Laughter as medicine … where is it

Sometimes life seems so serious and even the most obvious things are hard to provoke a good hearty laugh.  Laughing makes you feel better!  It takes fewer Read the rest of this entry »

 

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Mother-in-law moves in

Nearly everyone has a mother-in-law story.  I encourage everyone to remain independent and in their own homes.  This doesn’t mean they can’t participate in outside functions, attend family activities or have special outings with friends.  A little help is all others need.

Does aging have to be depressing? Read the rest of this entry »

 

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Simple tips … organizing and helping in the kitchen after brain injury

The kitchen is an area that can create significant chaos when things get put away in the wrong place.  It’s distressing to those Read the rest of this entry »

 

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Is sleep a problem

Sleep is a common problem. Most people dealing with traumatic brain and spinal cord injuries, ADD-ADHD, chronic medical conditions and injuries and more, have difficulty with sleep. I recommend  clicking on the highlighted red link to Sleep Struggles and Disorders for a comprehensive and quick list and easy to navigate.

This site has an extensive list of all types of sleep problems. Additions and deletions of articles will be maintained. Go to the bottom of the page and click and read the links you are interested.

English: Diagram illustrating the influence of...

English: Diagram illustrating the influence of dark-light rythms on circadian rythms and related physiology and behavior. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

These Links about Sleep, Sleep Struggles & Disorders, ADD, Spectrum & Sleep, Circadian Rhythms, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Restless Leg Syndrome (RLS), Apnea, Insomnia, Narcolepsy, Rarer Sleep Disorders, Other elements impacting sleep, Light, vision, and sleep … and more.

Please leave comments as you explore these links. What is helpful and what is not? How do these sleep disorders apply to your life and situation?

 

 

 

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Simple tips how to organize bedroom closet and drawers after traumatic brain injury

Keeping organized is essential to good mental and physical health.  Organization conserves Read the rest of this entry »

 

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Do not get that towel wet

A friend and I went to the local recreation center to try some water exercise.  This was her first time following 7 brain surgeries. Read the rest of this entry »

 

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Both sides to this scenario: physician and receptionist versus patient

Do the physicians really know what’s happening at the front desk?  Is it the patient that has the problem?  Is it the receptionist’s problem?  Usually Read the rest of this entry »

 

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Laughter as brain injury medicine … another day another year

I tried on and off all day to post a simple laughter note.  All I wanted to say Read the rest of this entry »

 

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Laughter as brain injury medicine … socks hanging on door

Have you laughed today?  Oh, how I love helping others and being their advocate … but sometimes Read the rest of this entry »

 

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2007 Christmas family gathering where most people wouldn’t expect

It’s the holiday season and reminders of years past.  It’s bad enough that my subarachnoid hemorrhage occurred December 22, 1991 … a date I will never forget and left my life and my immediate family’s altered forever!  What comes to mind now is Christmas time 2007! Read the rest of this entry »

 

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Simple tips to taking back control and saving relationships after injury Part 1 of 2

If you are depending on others to help get you through the early phases after brain injury, illness or other health issues remember to keep these dependencies temporary.  Take back control and do all the things you can do for yourself providing you stay safe.  Put fear behind you. Don’t let fear control you.  Don’t depend, join in and attend life! Read the rest of this entry »

 

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Laughter is the best brain injury medicine … just one childhood moment with friend

With all the sadness in the world, it’s time to laugh again! Have you ever done something as a child you never told your parents about? What was the motivation for doing it? Children are innocent and they have memories their parents Read the rest of this entry »

 

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If I could have, I would have … The Caring Children Program

In 1990 and 1991 two nurses from Cleveland, Ohio  health systems founded programs that taught children several levels of health in the elementary school setting. The  “Caring Children Program was taught in the classroom and other community settings as a team effort with nurses and children. Teaching focused on preventive health, education and understanding through hands-on skills and active participation. Read the rest of this entry »

 

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Laughter as brain injury medicine … recipe and kitchen disasters

Everyone has experienced some silly things that happen in kitchens.  Either we add the wrong ingredients, don’t follow directions, forget something, or simply don’t know what happened! Read the rest of this entry »

 

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Laughter as brain injury medicine … Is there a difference between guardrails and handrails

I was talking with another person recovering from brain injury when she was describing how her shower and home was adapted to meet special needs.  She was paralyzed on the right side and could not speak.  She knew exactly what Read the rest of this entry »

 

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Simple tips understanding injuries are very different … Part 2 of 2

Following the minor accident she sustained many symptoms.  Some of the problems she recalls are: memory problems, an inability to focus, poor judgement, poor financial decisions, unable to balance a checkbook, unable to compensate, unable to sleep, increase in pain, extreme fatigue, irritability, unable to be independent because of level of fatigue, required assistance to accomplish activities of daily living, profound confusion, and finally an inability to work at career that was her passion.

Most importantly, she was unable to care for herself and struggled to parent her daughters. She did not qualify for rehabilitation. Now she wonders why her brain didn’t qualify for rehabilitation, but her amputation was covered daily for several months!  Was her leg considered more valuable than

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Simple tips understanding injuries are very different … Part 1 of 2

How many have been compared to someone who have a visible injury? “Look how much someone can accomplish after they have lost limbs or have some other visible physical injuries.”  Is the frustration with brain injury Read the rest of this entry »

 

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Have you read “Are Hospitals Less Safe Than We Think?”

In Newsweek September 17, 2012, John Hopkins surgeon, Marty Makary addressed a number of problems within our healthcare system that employees do not talk about. Read the rest of this entry »

 

Laughter is the best medicine with brain injury — How much is too much noise

How do you measure how much noise is too much? I’d say this was too much

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You are not alone Part 2 of 4

If you go into work and do your best, there is NO room to worry about mistakes. Humans are not flawless, but there are boundaries that need to be set.  Revealing mistakes is human and can Read the rest of this entry »

 

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Can your health history be a hinderance to a timely diagnosis and treatment plan?

To tell or not to tell?

Does your health history help or hinder proper diagnosis and treatment following brain injury, stroke, brain dysfunctions, injuries or any type of illness?  I refer to illness as both physical and mental. Either way, these are health conditions that should be treated without prejudice, but they are not.  It is assumed that giving an accurate health history helps, and it should. Read the rest of this entry »

 

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To my last patient…and the last of my patience! Part 4 of 4

This is the final pages of my letter to my last patient part 4 of 4.  This letter in its entirety has clearly identified numerous safety issues without our healthcare system and specifically rehabilitation for neurology and traumatic brain injury patients.  Safety is ultimately the concern for all patients and staff.  Do healthcare professional overlook obvious symptoms because it is just a “job”?  Are patients truly safe?

Neither myself or immediate family ever sought legal action against this facility.  I was trying to get well and had no energy to do anything else.  In retrospect, if we only knew the long-term consequences and had the proper legal advice with authorities looking out for the innocent the outcome would have been totally different.  Maybe, it’s what nurses are expected to put up with and the facility is always right.
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To my last patient…and the last of my patience! Part 3 of 4

To my last patient part 3 of 4 poses a number of problems that cause further psychological harm to inpatient on this rehabilitation unit.  The fear they demonstrated throughout this lengthy stay was insurmountable.  It’s sad that these patients were more concerned about my well-being following the assault they witnessed than staff themselves.  Safety is always a priority.  How safe can anyone feel while being hospitalized? Read the rest of this entry »

 

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To my last patient…and the last of my patience! Part 2 of 4

This is part 2 of 4 on the letter I wrote to my last patient after the assault as a Registered Nurse on a Neurology-Head Injury Rehabilitation Unit in Northeast Ohio October 30, 1991.  In part 1 of 4 I included the table of contents for this letter.  This letter was retyped March, 2008 but otherwise has never had revisions.  It gives good insight into what was happening inside the healthcare system, and how I perceived the individual who assaulted myself and other healthcare professionals. Read the rest of this entry »

 

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General and simple tips for handling and taking medications Part 2 of 4

Allergies-Make a list of all your allergies.  The list of allergies should include both medication allergies and food allergies. DO NOT take any medications you are allergic to.  Usually the most serious allergic reaction occurs when you take the medication for the second time.  This can be life threatening. Read the rest of this entry »

 

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To my last patient…and the last of my patience! Part 1 of 4

This letter was written in 1993, a little over a year after my injury.  This letter details not only what was happening to me shortly after brain injury, but what was happening inside the healthcare system.  The information is accurate and correct as supported by documentation.  It has been retyped, but no other revisions exist. Read the rest of this entry »

 

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Healthcare professionals with a traumatic brain injury. Who should know better? Part 3 of 3

Awareness of Brain Injury Daily. I’m applauded with the behaviors and treatment toward my nurse friend when she needed educated healthcare professionals to help her.  Instead it was quite the opposite.  They simply did not understand traumatic brain injury and they believed she was manipulating her symptoms so she could work the hours of her choice.  If they only knew how she was suffering and what she needed to do to show up to work.  These healthcare professionals were totally in disbelief of her symptoms and never understood anything following her injury.  They began questioning her behaviors and other issues following this mild traumatic brain injury. She wasn’t even told or diagnosed with a mild traumatic brain injury until about a year following injury. Read the rest of this entry »

 

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Tips to take control of your health and healthcare needs

You are the most important person on your healthcare team.  I have read countless books over the past 20 years from “How to Get Out of the Hospital Alive”, and YOU The Smart Patient.  All of them have powerful messages.  Everyone could use the simple tips to keep you healthy.  I recommend that everyone retrieve a copy of the Handbook or Guide Book for “YOU” The Smart Patient as An Insider’s Handbook for Getting the Best Treatment. In addition, to keep track of the details that you need in your lifetime of medical care there are electronic flash drive medical bracelets. Read the rest of this entry »

 

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